Saturday, February 29, 2020

On This Day: Family Members Born on February 29

On this day, February 29, I found four leap year births in my family tree.

Family Events
1828 - Birth: Ann Jemima Coor-877, Copiah Co, Mississippi, USA
1868 - Birth: Eunice Belle Sabin-3861, Cedar Falls, Black Hawk Co, Iowa, USA
1868 - Birth: Linnie Sarah Gorrell-205, Cooper Co, Missouri, USA
1884 - Birth: Frank W. Hork-342, Muskegon, Muskegon Co, Michigan, USA

First One Has Conflicts
The first one listed above was on my mother’s side, a third great-aunt, Ann Jemima Coor. According to my genealogy database, she was born 29 February 1828 in Copiah County, Mississippi to John Coor and Ann Kethley as the fifth known child and the sister of my third great-grandfather, James Madison Coor. James and Ann married brothers and sisters Dempsey P. and Melissa Ann Welch. I wrote about Ann and Dempsey’s marriage here.

The problem with the above date, the source is a cemetery index book that only lists the birth and death years for both Dempsey P and Ann J Welch.[1] When I check Find A Grave, I can see an image of the tombstone and the birth and death years are all that are engraved on the stones.[2]

The date that was listed in the memorial was 19 February 1827. Of course, Find a Grave has no sources for the information. The tombstone certainly isn’t a source for the month and day of birth and death, as it only lists the years. I cannot message Ken Jones, who created the memorial, as he has passed away.

One of the sources I received early in my researching endeavors was a book called Welch Family written by Mary Helen Sims.[3] Mary Helen (Sanders) Sims was the daughter of Bessie V. Welch, granddaughter of Thomas Griffin Welch, Jr., great-granddaughter of Thomas Griffin Welch, who was the brother of Dempsey P. Welch. She was eleven when her grandfather died in 1935, but her great-grandparents were both dead before her birth. The sources for the book included family members, Autobiography of Jacob Perry Welch, the Department of Archives and History in Jackson, Mississippi, family bibles, and court records in Copiah County, Mississippi. However, none of the individual facts are sourced.

Ann Jemima Coor was listed twice in the book, first as wife of Dempsey Perry Welch. Here her birth was recorded as 17 February 1827.[4] There is also a whole section on the Coor family, copied from family records, where her birth was listed as 29 February 1828.[5] Along with the Find A Grave memorial, we have three conflicting dates for her birth with no source listed. Perhaps family papers meant a family bible, but could have also meant just family memory. Her mother (1892-1983) was only two when Dempsey and Ann died. Her grandfather, Thomas Griffin Welch (1865-1935) was old enough to have known his granduncle well, as they lived in the same community in Erath County, Texas.

Still, not knowing the sources for each of the dates, it is difficult to resolve the conflict. At this time, there are no newspapers at the Portal for Texas History website for January and February 1902 in this location of Erath County. I have emailed the librarian at the Stephenville Library for information about their newspapers in their collection, though I believe the online papers from Erath County came from the library’s collection. The death record recording in Erath County didn’t begin until 1903 according to the the FamilySearch catalog listing. 

I’ll save the other births for another post in the future.


[1] Shirley Brittain & Weldon I. Hudson Cawyer, Erath County Texas Cemetery Inscriptions Vol. 1 (Texas: n.p., n.d.), 166.
[2] Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 29 February 2020), memorial page for Angelina Jennine “Ann” Coor Welch (19 Feb 1827–28 Jan 1902), memorial no. 24126480, Huckabay Cemetery, Huckabay, Erath County, Texas, USA ; created by Ken Jones, maintained by Find A Grave (contributor 8).
[3] Mary Helen Sims, Welch Family, (Vicksburg, MS, n.d.).
[4] ibid, p. 39.
[5] ibid, p. 46.

Copyright © 2020 by Lisa S. Gorrell, Mam-ma's Southern Family, All rights reserved.

Saturday, February 22, 2020

52 Ancestors (2020) – Week 8: Prosperity—Dempsey Welch

This is my third year working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I have enjoyed writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

Before the Civil War, several of my mother’s southern families showed prosperity. In 1850, Dempsey Welch, of Copiah County, Mississippi, had a real estate value of $2400.[1]


This number was only his real estate, however he also had the ownership of thirty-seven enslaved persons ranging in age from age 43 to one month old.[2] The value of his personal property was not included in the 1850 census.


Ten years later, his real estate value was listed as $15,000 while the personal value was left blank.[3] This total value probably included personal property as well. 


The number of slaves he owned in 1860 totaled fifty-two.[4]


The next page:

Dempsey died in December 1864 and no probate record has been found. Perhaps the family agreed on the distribution of his assets. Or perhaps he had sold most of his real estate property by then. Certainly, the slaves he had owned were “emancipated” by the time of his death, though the state of Mississippi had not officially abolished slavery until 1995.[5]

Much of the prosperity for many southern families prior to the Civil War was due primarily to the ownership of slaves. It is heartbreaking to see these numbers of slaves he owned. The slave schedule unfortunately does not name any of the enslaved people, but there is the gender and age. One thing to do would be to create a spreadsheet to keep track of them. Many of these people might be living in the same vicinity in the 1870 census where they are named. Checking tax records, land records, and other records looking for clues are other strategies to take.

These people were a part of Dempsey Welch’s life story. I feel obligated to tell their story, too. Stay tuned.



[1] 1850 U.S. census, Copiah Co, Mississippi, pop. sched., p. 268b, dwelling 898, family 898, Dempsey Welch, digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 21 Mar 2011), citing NARA M432, roll 371.
[2] 1850 U.S. census, Copiah Co, Mississippi, slave sched., p. 194, Dempsey Welch, digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org), citing NARA M432, roll 384.
[3] 1860 U.S. census, Copiah Co, Mississippi, pop. sched., p. 161, dwelling 1121, family 1130, Dempsey Welch, digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 21 Mar 2011), citing NARA M653, roll 580.
[4] 1860 U.S. census, Copiah Co, Mississippi, slave sched., p. 99 & 100, Dempsey Welch, digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org), citing NARA M653, roll 597.
[5] Stephanie Cordon, “After 148 years, Mississippi finally ratifies 13th Amendment, which banned slavery,” CBSNews (https://www.cbsnews.com/news/after-148-years-mississippi-finally-ratifies-13th-amendment-which-banned-slavery/), 18 Feb 2013. It was ratified in 1995 but not made official until 2013 when the U.S. Archivist was notified.

Copyright © 2020 by Lisa S. Gorrell, Mam-ma's Southern Family, All rights reserved.

Friday, February 7, 2020

52 Ancestors (2020) – Week 6: Same Name – Sorting the two Ellis Lancasters of Kentucky

This is my third year working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I have enjoyed writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.


There were two Ellis Lancaster men who married in 1831 in Kentucky, one in Shelby County and the other in Fayette County. Both were born about 1808. Which one was my 4x-great-grandfather?

Here is what I know about my Ellis Lancaster. Ellis died about Sept 1866.[1] He stated he was born in Virginia, according to the 1850 census.[2] The family later moved to Kaufman County, Texas, where they were in 1860.[3]

His household was made up of these people  in 1860 in Kaufman County, Texas: [4]
Lancaster, E.W., 50, born in VA, a farmer, land worth $3000, personal property $830. 
      Elizabeth S., 58, female, white, b. KY
      Wm T, 22, male, white, farming, personal value 500, b. MO
      Geo W, 21, male, white, farming, personal value 500, b. MO
      Linace, 18, female, b. MO
      Catharine, 14, female, b. MO
      Martha J, 12, female, b. MO
      Hannah, 10, female, b. MO
Olds, Ben, 19 male, Mas Carpenter, personal value 750, b. MO
Boystone, R, 25, male, Mas Carpenter, b. KY
Neil, Wm, 17, male, farm laborer, personal value 4000, b. TN

In 1850, he lived in Lewis County, Missouri.[5] His family make up was:
Lancaster, Ellis W., 42 yrs, male, born in Virginia, land worth $2560.
    Elizabeth, 39, female, b. KY
    Sarah A, 17, female, b. MO
    James R, 15, male, b. MO
    Wm T, 13, male, b. MO
    George, 11, male, b. MO
    Lewis A, 7, female, b. MO
    Catharine, 3, female, b. MO
    Martha J. , 8/12, female, b. MO
He lived near Josiah R. Lancaster.

In 1840, he lived in Lewis County also. His household was made up of:[6]
3 males under 5 (James, William & George)
1 male under 40 (Ellis)
1 female under 10 (Sarah)
1 female under 30 (Elizabeth S).

Ellis’ wife was Elizabeth S. In searching marriages for Ellis W. Lancaster in Kentucky, thinking they married where she was from, two Ellis Lancasters were found in marriage indexes. I then searched the respective marriage records for each of the counties.

Ellis W. Lancaster to Elizabeth S. Neel, daughter of James, 10 Jun 1831, Shelby Co, Kentucky.[7]
Ellis Lancaster to Miss Susannah Perkins, 4 May 1831, Fayette Co., KY.[8]

Ellis didn’t seem like a common name, yet there were two men, about the same age, both marrying in 1831. Though Elizabeth and Susannah were not the same name, Elizabeth had a middle initial of S, which could be Susannah. The dates being so close to each other in 1831but in different counties, they have to be separate men. More information was needed.

In searching for Ellis Lancaster of Fayette Co, he was found in Jessamine County in 1840:[9]
Free White Persons - Males - Under 5:     1 (William)
Free White Persons - Males - 5 thru 9:     1 (Henry)
Free White Persons - Males - 20 thru 29:  1 (Ellis)
Free White Persons - Females - Under 5:  1 (Elizabeth)
Free White Persons - Females - 20 thru 29:  1 (Susan)

Moving forward in time to 1850, he was found in Owen County, Kentucky, with Susan. Ellis and family were all born in Kentucky.[10]
Ellis Lancaster              40
Susan Lancaster          38
Henry Lancaster          16
Elizabeth Lancaster    14
William Lancaster       12
Walter Lancaster         10
Mallory Lancaster       8
Ellis Lancaster              6
John Lancaster            4

They were still in Owen County, Kentucky in 1860.[11] In 1870, his apparent wife was named Elizabeth.[12] Had Susan died? 

Conclusion
Two men of the same name, Ellis Lancaster, married in the same year, 1831, but one Ellis stayed in Kentucky with wife Susan, and the other moved to Missouri and then on to Texas. The Texas Lancaster was born in Virginia and his wife was Elizabeth S. This Ellis was my 4x-great-grandfather.

Ellis Lancaster (1808?-1866) & Elizabeth S. Neel
----George W. Lancaster (1839-1919) & Martha J Polly
---------William Carl Lancaster (1873-1946) & Martha J Coor
-------------George Warren Lancaster (1893-1964) & Lela Ann Loveless
----------------Pansy Louise Lancaster & Tom J Johnston Jr.

Pansy was my grandmother.


[1] Issuance of Bond to E.S. Lancaster, Kaufman Co, Texas Probate Records, 1858-1870, p. 341, Bond and Affidavit, estate of E.W. Lancaster, 1866.
[2] 1850 U.S. census, Lewis Co, Missouri, pop. sched, p. 707 (355 stamped), dwelling 355, family 415, Ellis W. Lancaster, digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 20 Jan 2011), citing NARA M432, roll 404.
[3] 1860 U.S. census, Kaufman Co, Texas, pop. sched., p. 41, dwelling 338, family 340, E. W. Lancaster, digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 20 Jan 2011), citing NARA M653, roll 1299.
[4] 1860 U.S. census, Kaufman Co, Texas, E. W. Lancaster.
[5] 1850 U.S. census, Lewis Co, Missouri, Ellis W. Lancaster.
[6] 1840 U.S. census, Lewis Co, Missouri, pop. sched., p. 186, Ellis Lancaster, digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 20 Jan 2011), citing NARA M704, roll 225.
[7] Shelby County, Kentucky, "Marriage Bonds 1831-1835," image 230 & 231, Ellis W. Lancaster to Elizabeth S Neel, “Marriage Records, 1797-1954,” database & digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org); citing FHL film 259286.
[8] Fayette County, Kentucky, “Bonds 1830-1836,” image 245 & 246, Ellis Lancaster to Susan Ann Perkins, “Marriage Records, 1797-1954,” database & digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org); citing FHL film 9003.
[9] 1840 U.S. census, Jessamine Co, Kentucky, p. 235, Ellis Lancaster, digital image Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com : accessed 7 Feb 2020), citing NARA M704, roll 116.
[10] 1850 U.S. census, Owen Co, Kentucky, District No. 2, p. 221 (stamped), family 795, Ellis Lancaster, digital image, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com : accessed 7 Feb 2020), citing NARA M432, roll 216.
[11] 1860 U.S. census, Owen Co, Kentucky, District 1, p. 50, family 322, Ellis Lancaster, digital image, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com : accessed 7 Feb 2020), citing NARA M653, roll 391.
[12] 1870 U.S. census, Owen Co, Kentucky, Owenton, p. 287b, family 25, Ellis Lancaster, digital image, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com : accessed 7 Feb 2020), citing NARA M593, roll 493.

Copyright © 2020 by Lisa S. Gorrell, Mam-ma's Southern Family, All rights reserved.

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

52 Ancestors (2020) – Week 3: Long Line – Lancaster Family

This is my third year working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I have enjoyed writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

Three Generations of Lancasters
My grandmother holding my mother & my great-grandparents & great-uncle

My grandmother was born Pansy Louise Lancaster (1913-2013). I have researched the Lancaster line back to Robert Lancaster (1784-1840), who was her 3x-great-grandfather. 

·   George Warren Lancaster (1893-1964)
o William Carl Lancaster (1873-1946)
§  George W. Lancaster (1839-1919)
·   Ellis Wilson Lancaster (1808-1866)
o Robert Lancaster (1784-1840)

I found Robert Lancaster in Shelby County, Kentucky in the 1820, 1830, and 1840 censuses.[1] He purchased land from Thomas Hanna and his wife Mary on 5 December 1821. This land was located on the waters of Floyds fork and Luteses run, being a branch of Bullskin creek containing 231 acres and eight poles.[2] He and his wife, Sarah Ellis, had six children together. He had another wife, perhaps named Jane, and they had two daughters. His last marriage was to Mary Taylor and there were no children.

Some of the possessions and slaves went to Mary at Robert’s death, but the land was divided among seven children: John S. Lancaster, Ellis W. Lancaster, Josiah R. Lancaster, William T Lancaster, Lennis Mary Ann Neill, Elizabeth Myers, and Eliza Jane Lancaster.[3]

I have not personally found records of Robert’s parents, though many trees name them as Nathaniel Lancaster (1734-1809) and Hope Walker (1740-1785), of Goochland and Prince Edward Counties, Virginia.[4] From there, these trees trace the Lancaster line back to Cumberland, England into the 1500s.[5]

I do not add people from these family trees any longer—I have enough individuals I entered when I was a starting genealogist that I don’t have proof of relationships. Some day, I will use the hints from the tree to trace Robert’s parents and find documents that might help prove his relationship to them. But it is fascinating that someone thinks this line goes back that far!


[1] 1820 U.S. census, Shelby Co, Kentucky, pop. sched., p. 154 (penned), Robert Lancaster, digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com); citing NARA M33, roll 24. See also 1830 U.S. census, Shelby Co, Kentucky, pop. sched., p. 276, Robert Lancaster, digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com); NARA M19, roll 41. See also 1840 U.S. census, Shelby Co, Kentucky, pop. sched., p. 117, Robt Lancaster, digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com); NARA M704, roll 123.
[2] Shelby County, Kentucky, Land Records, Bk S, p. 315-16, Thos Hanna to Robert Lancaster, 1821, digital image, FamilySearch (http://familysearch.org); citing FHL film 0259235.
[3] For land division, see Shelby County, Kentucky, Probate Records, Bk 15, p. 106-07, 1843, Robert Lancaster land division, digital image, FamilySearch (http://familysearch.org ), citing FHL film 259255, item 1.
[4] Nathaniel Lancaster and spouse Hope Walker are found in many trees on Ancestry. See “Holler Family Tree,” owned by HollerT, and “Meservy Family Tree” owned by Steven Paul Meservy as examples.
[5] FamilySearch Family Tree (https://www.familysearch.org/tree/pedigree/landscape/L8BC-LQ9 : accessed 15 Jan 2020) Robert Lancaster, no. GMRF-8D1.

Copyright © 2020 by Lisa S. Gorrell, Mam-ma's Southern Family, All rights reserved.

9th Blogiversary



This is my 9th anniversary of the start of my blog. I attended a wonderful class at the California Genealogical Society given by Craig Siulinski and he taught us how to blog. Janice Sellers was also in the class and we support each other's writing.

I began this blog to write about my maternal grandmother's ancestors. I later found it was too restricting and created a second blog to cover all of my other ancestors (and my husband's, too).

I don't write as often with this blog as I would like, but I wrote sixteen posts last year, mostly as part of the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, which I shared posts across both blogs. I will make an attempt to write more of my 52 Ancestors here this coming year.

Copyright © 2020 by Lisa S. Gorrell, Mam-ma's Southern Family, All rights reserved.

Wednesday, January 1, 2020

52 Ancestors (2020) – Week 1: Fresh Start

This is my third year working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I have enjoyed writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.


I have several ancestors who either made fresh starts before the Civil War, or made them after the end of the Civil War. These ancestors all moved to Texas, where probably the draw of available land lured them. Once one family member went, others followed.

From my maternal grandfather’s side

My three-times maternal great-grandmother, Amanda A. (Haley) Jones (1827-1904), first followed her husband, Benjamin W. Jones (1822-1864) during the Civil War and after his death, she moved first to Hays County, Texas, and then to Comanche County.[1]

A three-times maternal great-grandfather, Samuel Johnston (1816-bef 1869), must have seen the writing on the wall about the upcoming war in the south. He moved his family to Titus County, Texas sometime in the early 1860s.[2] He passed away sometime before 1869 and later his wife, Elizabeth (McCormack) Johnston (and children moved to Comanche Co, Texas sometime between 1870 and 1880.[3]

Benjamin F. Selman (1795-1873) and Sarah (Bean) Selman (1798-1868), my maternal four-times great-grandparents, came to Texas from Tennessee/Alabama before 1850. They were living in Cherokee County with their five children in 1850.[4] Here is someone who might be a candidate for a Texas State Genealogical Society Heritage Certificate, specifically the Texas First Families Certificate, if they arrived before 19 Feb 1846, or the Gone to Texas Pioneer Certificate, for those who were living in Texas prior to 1866. I have not researched this family much, having gotten most of the information about them from pages of a book sent to me by my mother’s cousin, Sandra Bay Hall. This would be a great project to work on during my trip to the Family History Library in late May.

From my maternal grandmother’s side

Ellis W. Lancaster (1808-1866) and his wife Elizabeth (Neel) Lancaster (1811-1881) came from Shelby County, Kentucky, through Lewis County, Missouri, to Kaufman County (now Rockwall Co), Texas in the late 1850s.[5]  His sons served with the Confederate units from Texas.[6]

Nathan H.O. Polly (1820-1902) and his wife, Lydia M (1828-1912), came to Texas from Kentucky sometime before 1850, where he was living in Dallas County.[7] He was a circuit-riding minister.

James Madison Coor (1833-1889) didn’t leave Copiah County, Mississippi until after 1880. It is possible that he followed one of his daughters and her husband to Erath County, Texas. A newspaper article described his arrival to the area.[8]

Abner Ebenezer Loveless (1851-1929) arrived in Texas sometime between 1904 and 1908 from Faulkner County, Arkansas, where he was a farmer and part-time Baptist minister.[9] His wife, Eliza A. (Rodgers) Loveless (1854-1907) in Faulkner County.[10] Likely, he moved to Texas to be near his son, James A Loveless. Three of his youngest children came with him: Robert, William H, and Lela Ann.



[1] She first appeared in the 1868 Hays County tax roll: "Texas County Tax Rolls, 1846-1910," Familysearch (http://www.familysearch.org), Hays Co, 1868, Amanda Jones (image 14). She moved to Comanche County before 1880: 1880 U.S. census, Comanche Co, Texas, pop. sched., prec No 3, ED 30, p 95a, fam 170, W. George Knox, digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com); citing NARA T9, roll 1297.
[2] He first appeared in Titus County tax records in 1862: "Texas County Tax Rolls, 1846-1910," Familysearch (http://www.familysearch.org), Titus Co, 1862, p. 32, Samuel Johnson, FS dig film 4653615.
[3] 1880 U.S. census, Comanche Co, Texas, pop. sched., Prec 3, p 95, household 171, fam 179, J. Marion Johnston,   digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com); citing NARA T9, roll 1297.
[4] 1850 U.S. census, Cherokee Co, Texas, p 887, fam 561, Benj Selman, digital image, Ancestry  (http://www.ancestry.com:); citing NARA M432, roll 909.
[5] He purchased land from Henry McHenry and Mary Standifer on 2 Feb 1859. See Rockwall County, Texas, Deeds, v. I, p. 360, Samuel H McHenry to EW Lancaster and v. I, p. 362-63, Mary Standifer to EW Lancaster, FHL film 1302480.
[6] J.R. Lancaster served with the 18th Texas Cavalry; Wm T. Lancaster served with the 20th Texas Cavalry; George W. Lancaster served with the 6th Texas Cavalry.
[7] 1850 U.S. census, Dallas Co, Texas, pop. sched., p. 93 (stamped), dwelling 305, family 314, Nathan H. O. Polly, digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com: ), citing NARA M432, roll 910.
[8] “Kikers Mill,” Stephenville Empire, 6 Jan 1883, p. 3.
[9] He sold land to T.M. Loveless on the 31 Dec 1904: see Faulkner Co, Arkansas, Circuit Clerk records, Deeds, Bk 29, p. 98, Warranty Deed, E. Loveless to T.M. Loveless. On 12 September 1908, he married Mellissa M Settle. See Erath County, Texas, Marriages, Bk L, p. 42, 1908, E Loveless to Mrs MM Blount, FHL film 1026028.
[10] Desmond Walls Allen, Pence Funeral Home Conway, Arkansas 1904-1926 Vol II (Rapid Rabbit Copy Co, Conway, AR), p 51, Eliza Loveless.

Copyright © 2020 by Lisa S. Gorrell, Mam-ma's Southern Family, All rights reserved.

Friday, October 18, 2019

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 42: Adventure: Traveling from North Carolina to Mississippi Territory in 1811

This is my second year working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I have enjoyed writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

In 1811, John Core [Coor] of Sampson County, North Carolina, obtained a passport to travel through “Indian Nations to the Western Country.” He was with his mother, his four sisters and two small children – negroes. Also receiving passports at the same, and thus may have been traveling with John were Mr. John Keayhey [Kethley] with his wife, seven children, and three negroes from Richmond County, North Carolina, and William and Henry Toler, from Cumberland.[1]

Here is the image from the book. This is a transcript of course, not the actual passport.[2] During the 1930s, the passports as a project of the WPA, were transcribed/abstracted by two members of the Samuel Sorrel Chapter in Houston of the National Society of Daughters of the American Revolution under the direction of Mrs. J. E. Hays, the state historian of the Georgia Department of Archives and History.[3]



These passports were obtained from the Governor of Georgia to travel through the Creek Nation. Their ending goal was Mississippi territory. Often people traveled together for safety. However, these three families were from different places.

John Coor was already living in Mississippi before he obtained this passport. He was enumerated 1810 in Franklin County as a single male over twenty-one.[4] Perhaps he returned home to bring his mother and sisters out to the territory he had previous scoped.

How did they get from Sampson County, North Carolina to Lawrence County, Mississippi?  Possible trail is the Federal Road.

  • The Federal Road, started in 1805. The Creek allowed a development of a “horse path” through their lands in order for a more efficient method of delivering mail from Washington City to New Orleans. It started at Fort Wilkinson (near Milledgeville, Georgia) and ended at Fort Stoddert (near Mobile, Alabama). It was widen in 1811.[5]

Did the passport give them safety to travel across the Indian Lands? Perhaps. They did arrive in Lawrence County and John ended up marrying Ann, the daughter of John Kethley.




[1] Passports of Southeastern Pioneers 1770–1823, Indian, Spanish and other Land Passports for Tennessee, Kentucky, Georgia, Mississippi, Virginia, North and South Carolina, Dorothy Williams Potter, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., p. 294. This book can be viewed at FamilySearch, digital film 7900778.
[2] I am attempting to find the original passports so I can get an image of this one. Waiting to hear back from the archivist at the Georgia Archives.
[3] “Introduction,” Passports Issued by Governors of Georgia, 1785-1820.
[4] “Mississippi State and Territorial Censuses, 1792-1866,” digital images, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com : 18 Oct 2019), 1810, Franklin Co, p 4, line 9, John Coor, citing Microfilm V229, 3 rolls, Heritage Quest.
[5] “Federal Road (Creek Lands),” Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federal_Road_(Creek_lands).


Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, Mam-ma's Southern Family, All rights reserved.