Tuesday, March 20, 2012

Fearless Females - Day 20

This is a blogging theme for the month of March which is Women's History Month. I'm a bit behind but do want to participate in the daily blogging posts. These 31 posts will be posted between my two blogs "My Trails Into the Past" and "Mam-ma's Southern Family."


March 20 — Is there a female ancestor who is your brick wall? Why? List possible sources for finding more information.

One of my brick wall female ancestor is Eliza A. Rogers.  She is my 2nd great grandmother.  Eliza was born in 1854 in South Carolina.  I do not know who her parents are.  She married Ebenezer Loveless on 18 Mar 1871 in Chattooga Co, Georgia.  They had ten children.  She died in Faulkner Co, Arkansas on 27 Aug 1907 and is buried at Spring Hill Cemetery.

I have not worked on this line in ages.  Just reviewing this now I see some things I should do:
  1. Find out when death certificates became mandatory in Arkansas and try to obtain one for her.
  2. Find a tombstone on www.find-a-grave.com in Faulkner Co, Arkansas
  3. Find the obituary for Eliza
  4. Research the children of Eliza and Ebenezer who did not move to Texas and remained in Arkansas.  Maybe one of their children have information.
  5. Search all the Rogers/Rodgers in Chattooga Co, GA 1870 census.  I have not looked since census records have been online.
Wow, that is a good start.  I actually just found the tombstone for Eliza:

Springhill Cemetery, Faulkner Co, Arkansas




Copyright © 2011 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, Mam-ma's Southern Family

Fearless Females - Day 16

This is a blogging theme for the month of March which is Women's History Month. I'm a bit behind but do want to participate in the daily blogging posts. These 31 posts will be posted between my two blogs "My Trails Into the Past" and "Mam-ma's Southern Family."


March 16 — If you could have lunch with any female family member (living or dead) or any famous female who would it be and why? Where would you go? What would you eat?

My 2nd great grandmother was Martha J Coor.  I would love to have lunch with her and eat some good southern food.  I'd want to eat right in her kitchen so I can watch her fix the meal.

At the meal I'd ask about the possible Native American ancestry we might have.  She seems like the most likely candidate but all records I find about her family do not point to any Native American ancestry.  So why does my grandmother think that her grandmother was half Indian?

A puzzle we may never solve......

Copyright © 2011 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, Mam-ma's Southern Family

Saturday, March 17, 2012

Fearless Females - Day 12

This is a blogging theme for the month of March which is Women's History Month. I'm a bit behind but do want to participate in the daily blogging posts. These 31 posts will be posted between my two blogs "My Trails Into the Past" and "Mam-ma's Southern Family."

March 12 — Working girl: Did your mother or grandmother work outside the home? What did she do? Describe her occupation.

My grandmother worked outside the home most of her life. She was a great seamstress and could always get a job in alterations, working in both men's and women's stores. She told me her mother was good at sewing and made all of my grandmother's clothes.  My grandmother's favorite class at Stephenville High School was Home Ec.

She worked several stores in downtown Walnut Creek, California. Celeata's was a men's store where she did alterations. She also worked at the Clothes Horse, a women's store. She would take clothes home each night to do alterations, working until about midnight, and then bring them back in in the morning. At the same time, she worked on alterations with another women's store called Goldman's.


I remember her old black Singer electric sewing machine. My grandfather, a carpenter, built a cabinet for the machine.  Before that she had one of those treadle machines you worked with your feet.


She made a lot of clothes for herself, her husband, and for her daughter.

My grandparents


Copyright © 2011 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, Mam-ma's Southern Family

Thursday, March 15, 2012

Fearless Females - Day 8

This is a blogging theme for the month of March which is Women's History Month. I'm a bit behind but do want to participate in the daily blogging posts. These 31 posts will be posted between my two blogs "My Trails Into the Past" and "Mam-ma's Southern Family."

March 8 — Did one of your female ancestors leave a diary, journal, or collection of letters? Share an entry or excerpt.
Poems written by Lea N Hork, 1954

I do not have a collection of letters, a diary, or journal that any of my female ancestors left.  However, I have some typed stories and poems my mother, Lela Nell Johnston, wrote.  They were simple stories, told by a young author.  I imagine my mother wanted to write more but with six young children, I doubt she could find the time.

Her favorite time of the day to do things for herself was between 4 and 6 AM.  She would get up with my father who had to be at work by 4:30 and then would have all that quiet time alone until us kids got up for school around 6:30 or 7:00 AM.  Then she would then fix us a hot breakfast of oatmeal or cream of wheat.

What I have here today are three of her poems written in the same year I was born.  They are typewritten using a red ribbon!  I didn't know there was such a thing in 1954.  I remember the typewriter.  It was a small manual that sat in a case with a lid.  I remember typing on it until I got an electric typewriter for Christmas.  The keys would jamb if you typed too fast.

Of the three poems, I like "Everything, but this" best.  Poetry has never been my favorite, but my sisters like them and have written some themselves.



Happy reading!


Copyright © 2011 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, Mam-ma's Southern Family

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Fearless Females - Day 7

This is a blogging theme for the month of March which is Women's History Month. I'm a bit behind but do want to participate in the daily blogging posts. These 31 posts will be posted between my two blogs "My Trails Into the Past" and "Mam-ma's Southern Family." 

March 7 — Share a favorite recipe from your mother or grandmother’s kitchen. Why is this dish your favorite? If you don’t have one that’s been passed down, describe a favorite holiday or other meal you shared with your family.

When I was married, my mother, Lea Hork, made a recipe-photo album for me.  She typed up her favorite recipes, added personal comments about the recipe, and then clipped them.  She then made a scrapbook full of photos from my childhood and included the favorite recipes.  As each of us kids were married, she'd make another album for them.  My youngest sister was married after my mother passed away, so I carefully made an album for her, copying what my mother had done for me.

I still have the album, although I took it apart because it was one of those magnetic photo albums and I didn't want the photos to be ruined.  Luckily for me, the magnetic part of the album "released" and now of the photos were "stuck" between the back and plastic.

The book especially comes out at Thanksgiving so I can make Cornbread Stuffing for the turkey.  This is the Southern way of making stuffing.  I find typical sage dressing just too wet for my tastes.  Our Thanksgiving Dinners included: turkey, giblet gravy, cornbread stuffing, mashed potatoes, candied sweet potatoes, peas with pearl onions, garlic French bread, and cranberry sauce.  Pumpkin and mince meat pies were for dessert.

My mouth's watering just thinking about it!

Lea's Southern Cornbread Stuffing: (suitable for 20 lb turkey)




Copyright © 2011 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, Mam-ma's Southern Family

Sunday, March 11, 2012

Fearless Females - Day 3


This is a blogging theme for the month of March which is Women's History Month. I'm a bit behind but do want to participate in the daily blogging posts. These 31 posts will be posted between my two blogs "My Trails Into the Past" and "Mam-ma's Southern Family."

March 3 — Do you share a first name with one of your female ancestors? Perhaps you were named for your great-grandmother, or your name follows a particular naming pattern. If not, then list the most unique or unusual female first name you’ve come across in your family tree.

I do not share a first name with any of my ancestors, but my mother, Lela Nell, was named after her grandmother, Lela Ann Loveless Lancaster. Later my mother went by Lea instead, I guess because it didn't sound so Texan. My mother's Texas accent was gone, too.

Above is a photo of my great grandmother, Lela Ann, great grandfather Warren, my mother Lela Nell, my grandmother, Pansy Louise, and her brother, Wayne.


Copyright © 2011 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, Mam-ma's Southern Family

Thursday, March 8, 2012

Fearless Females - Day 1

This is a blogging theme for the month of March which is Women's History Month.  I'm a bit behind but do want to participate in the daily blogging posts.

Day 1: Do you have a favorite female ancestor? One you are drawn to or want to learn more about? Write down some key facts you have already learned or what you would like to learn and outline your goals and potential sources you plan to check.

I would like to know more about my grandmother's mother, Lela Ann (Loveless) Lancaster.  She was born 2 April 1895 in Conway, Faulkner Co, Arkansas to Ebenezer Loveless & Eliza A Rogers.  She married George Warren Lancaster 15 Dec 1912 in Stephenville, Erath Co, Texas.  They had four children; my grandmother was the oldest.

My grandmother told me her mother was ill most of my grandmother's young life and that my grandmother had extra chores around the house and she took care of her brothers.  What was wrong with Lela Ann?  She did live until she was 57 years old, dying 17 May 1951 in Texas.

Researching Goals:

  • Find death certificate for Lela Ann Lancaster
  • Determine when the Loveless family moved to Texas from Arkansas
  • Learn more about what she died of once I see the cause of death on the death certificate


Copyright © 2011 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, Mam-ma's Southern Family

Wednesday, March 7, 2012

Wordless Wednesday -- Pansy & Lela Nell Johnston

Pansy Louise Lancaster Johnston holding daughter, Lela Nell

Copyright © 2011 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, Mam-ma's Southern Family